Friday, December 06, 2019

Group to candidates: Don’t leave trash during sorties

Mar 02. 2019
The May 9, 2016, elections generated tons of trash. This photo, taken in May 2016, shows a pile of campaign materials in Cebu City that a city worker prepares for hauling. (Photo by JUNJIE MENDOZA / Cebu Daily News)
The May 9, 2016, elections generated tons of trash. This photo, taken in May 2016, shows a pile of campaign materials in Cebu City that a city worker prepares for hauling. (Photo by JUNJIE MENDOZA / Cebu Daily News)
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By Philippine Daily Inquirer
Asia News Network

3,803 Viewed

MANILA, Philippines — A pro-business environmental advocacy group urges candidates in the midterm polls to not leave their garbage in public places during their campaign sorties.

“We challenge all candidates and their supporters to stop leaving a messy trail of garbage during their campaign sorties and instead demonstrate discipline and a true commitment for order and cleanliness,” Philippine Business for Environmental Stewardship (PBEST) said in a statement issued on Wednesday.

“Littering our neighborhoods and public places with their posters and streamers only show a shameless disregard for the environment and disrespect to the constituents they are promising to serve,” PBEST said.

The group also warned candidates to not put up their campaign materials on trees as they must follow an environmentally friendly campaign.

“We are warning all candidates not to use our precious trees as placeholders for their campaign materials,” it said.

“We fully support and echo the Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ (DENR) call for candidates to make their campaigns environmentally friendly and urge candidates to be mindful of their campaign posters and abide by the rules on where to put up these campaign materials,” it added.

PBEST also said that when a candidate “professes love for the environment” it must show proof and not cheap words.

Under Commission on Elections (Comelec) rules, election materials may only be posted in common poster areas or public areas like plazas, markets and barangay centers.

Campaign materials can be put up on private property but must have the consent of the owners.

Election posters must be limited in the size to 2 feet by 3 feet.

Violators may face election offense charges and even possible disqualification if they do not comply with Comelec rules.

“We call on netizens to be vigilant and report violators,” PBEST said. “Take photos and spread the word on social media. Reach out to your friends in media to shout at these environmentally unfriendly politicians a strong message offense.”

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