Thursday, December 12, 2019

The day Thai timelines were set alight

Nov 27. 2015
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By KORNCHANOK RAKSASERI
@Aim_TH

4,632 Viewed

THE LOY KRATHONG tradition may have different meanings for different people, but originally it was meant to be a day of gratitude, respect, worship and forgiveness. This is possibly why many Thai social-media users chose to use this day as a day of reflec
Many also posted their plans on how they would celebrate the festival before posting photos of where, how and with who they marked the day. 
Pictures of beautiful floats, as well as children and adults dressed in traditional attire and images from different sites were shared. Even Liverpool FC joined the fun by posting clips of its players wishing people a happy Loy Krathong. 
Plenty of campaigns were also launched before festivities began. The biggest one was to ask people not to let off flying lanterns, as they may be dangerous for planes and may cause fires. Another campaign called on people to be considerate when using fireworks as they can scare pets and annoy others. Pet owners, especially those with dogs, were advised to keep their pets inside and comfort them so they do not flee the house and get lost. 
Wilairat Aimaiem wrote on Facebook: “Others may enjoy Loy Krathong, yet I don’t want to do anything else but rush back and play with my dogs. I don’t want them to be scared of the fireworks.”
@yuteesonyu tweeted: “The fireworks remind me of another tweet. It said a woman hid under the table once she heard the sound and others laughed at her, not knowing she came from a southernmost province.”
@aviknowledge, a Twitter account sharing tips about avia?tion, wrote on Wednesday: “Enjoy Loy Krathong Day and please remember not to release the flying lanterns in the areas of flights.”
However, on Thursday it posted that a pilot flying over Chiang Mai reported seeing at least 10 lanterns at the height of 33,000 feet. 
Many people also campaigned for the use of natural materials for the floats instead of polystyrene, though @pptv ran a scoop with scientists saying that krathongs made out of bread were very bad for the water as well. 
@beaver_ch5, meanwhile, promoted the fest online via loykratong.kapook.com and ecarddesig?nanimation.com, while Facebook user Moo Foo, who was working at night, posted an image of a digital krathong she “floated” online, and said she remembered to touch the mouse to her head before making a wish. 
The Friends of the River group also used this opportunity to campaign against the government’s plan to build a Bt14-billion promenade along the Chao Phraya. 
Since Loy Krathong this year fell on November 25, which is also International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, some social-media users joined the world in posting white ribbons. 
Though Facebook users and Tweeters may stop posting about their Loy Krathong celebrations soon, several discussions will continue unabated. They include the many attacks and retaliation taking place across the world, actor Trisadee Sahawong’s fight against dengue fever and the media ethics, not to mention scandals surrounding the Rajabhakti Park project. 
Let’s wait and see how things progress ahead of the International Anti-Corruption Day on December 9. 

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