Sunday, September 19, 2021

in-focus

Majority of people shun superstition in quest of lottery luck: poll


A recent poll shows that a great majority of people consider winning a lottery just a matter of luck, uninfluenced by the superstitious practices many people fall prey to.

1277

View

The Nida poll showed that 70 per cent of respondents considered winning a lottery a matter of personal luck, 37 per cent thought that expecting sacred practices to help was being naive, while 36 per cent said lucky numbers from celebs was just a marketing trend.
The Nida Poll on "Lucky number: luck or lie" was conducted between November 11-13 by the National Institute of Development Administration, and surveyed 1,320 people aged more than 15 years old nationwide.
The poll also took people's opinion on news of sacred things or strange events at various places that give lottery numbers and lucky numbers obtained from celebrities, singers, and actors.

When asked for their opinion on news of sacred or strange events at various places giving hint of lucky lottery numbers:
- 37.12 per cent of people said it was stupid;
- 27.50 per cent said it was an opportunity for a fortune;
- 20.68 per cent said it was a marketing strategy to generate a trend;
- 16.21 per cent said they believed in sacred lucky numbers or "the incident";
- 2.73 per cent said it was a personal belief;
- 0.68 per cent did not answer or ignored the question.

Asked about news being published on people winning a lucky number from a sacred or strange event in various places:
- 70.61 per cent of respondents said it was an individual's luck;
- 22.58 per cent said it was just a coincidence, but it was credulous;
- 7.58 per cent said it was a marketing strategy to generate a flow;
- 4.62 per cent said it was lucky, whether sacred or a strange incident;
- 3.48 per cent said it was an impulse to buy or want to ask for a lucky number;
- 1.29 per cent said it was a strangely interesting thing.

Regarding lucky lottery numbers obtained from celebrities, singers, or actors:
- 36.29 per cent of respondents said it was a marketing strategy to generate a trend;
- 31.06 per cent said it was stupid;
- 27.95 per cent said it was an opportunity for a fortune;
- 6.29 per cent believed in celebrity lucky numbers
- 2.20 per cent did not know or did not care.

Asked about news of celebrities, singers and actors who won the lottery with their lucky numbers:
- 52.73 per cent said it was the luck of each person;
- 24.02 per cent said it was just a coincidence;
- 17.20 per cent said it was a marketing strategy to generate a trend;
- 6.44 per cent said it was the luck of the sacred that the stars looked up to;
- 5.45 per cent said it was an impulse to buy before the next period;
- 3.86 per cent said that it was a unique ability of an individual;
- 1.82 per cent said it was a strangely interesting thing;
- 0.68 per cent did not know or did not answer.

When asked about people buying lucky numbers based on sacred things, strange events or celebrities in the past one year, the survey found:
- 68.79 per cent said that they did not buy the idea;
- 17.88 per cent said they had never bought a lottery ticket in the past year;
- 11-14 per cent said that their purchase was influenced by a sacred thing;
- 5.30 per cent said their purchase was based on strange events;
- 2.73 per cent said they had once purchased based on what celebrities had said.

Asked whether the media should publish news about lucky numbers:
- 68.03 per cent said it was freedom of the press whether to continue to offer such news or to stop offering such news;
- 21.29 per cent said the media should stop offering such news;
- 9.92 per cent said the media should continue to offer the news;
- 0.76 per cent did not answer

Published : November 15, 2020

By : The Nation