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Chadchart, Chakthip among preferred top choices for Bangkok governor: poll


The majority of respondents in a National Institute of Development Administration (Nida) survey backed former transport minister Chadchart Sittipunt and former police chief Pol General Chakthip Chaijinda for the post of Bangkok governor.

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The survey was conducted on March 2 and 3 on 1,315 Bangkokians aged over 18 years.

Asked about the nominee the respondents would support:

66.00 per cent said an independent nominee;

17.11 per cent said a nominee affiliated with a political party;

14.30 per cent said anyone;

2.59 per cent said a nominee affiliated with a political group.

Regarding problems the respondents want the Bangkok governor to solve (multiple choice):

66.01 per cent said traffic;

35.29 per cent - cost of living;

33.84 per cent - environment, such as air and water pollution;

31.18 per cent - flooding;

24.18 per cent - narcotics and crimes;

20.15 per cent - garbage;

20.00 per cent - roads and footpaths;

9.20 per cent - hawkers;

8.67 per cent - education;

8.14 per cent - public health;

5.63 per cent - children and youth;

0.46 per cent - lights and jaywalkers;

Asked who they would vote as Bangkok governor:

29.96 per cent said they haven't decided;

22.43 per cent named former transport minister Chadchart Sittipunt;

15.51 per cent said former police chief Pol General Chakthip Chaijinda;

7.68 per cent said current Bangkok governor Pol General Aswin Kwanmuang;

4.49 per cent said a nominee from Pheu Thai Party;

4.26 per cent named former senator Rosana Tositrakul;

4.26 per cent said a nominee from the Progressive Movement Group;

3.35 per cent named Suchatvee Suwansawat, president of King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang;

3.27 per cent said a nominee from Palang Pracharath Party;

2.66 per cent said a nominee from Democrat Party;

1.75 per cent said Bangkok deputy governor Sakoltee Phattiyakul;

0.23 per cent didn't answer;

0.15 per cent said they would not vote.

Published : March 07, 2021

By : The Nation